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Fossil Identification


What are these rocks/fossils?


pilot   12-10-2009 om 15:07

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11







Hello readers.
I don't know much about rocks and fossils, but I am interested. I have found these (to me) interesting rocks. I am curious what they are, I have got no idea. Two of the rocks contain fossils.
Photo 1 I found next to a building, in the Netherlands, on a gravelpath, so that is not the original location.
Photos 2 and 3 I found in Denmark.
Photo 3 contains no fossil, but contains holes from gass bubbles? Any ideas about the origin? Volcanic?

I hope you guys can help.

 
paleobear   13-10-2009 om 15:55

paleobear
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The second picture looks like the section of a rugose coral to me.

 
pilot   17-10-2009 om 18:20

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11

quote:
paleobear wrote:
The second picture looks like the section of a rugose coral to me.



Thanks paleobeer.
I have been googling rugose coral when I read your answer, and seen several pictures. Looking at them I think you must be right. Its nice to know.
Any ideas on the other rocks?

 
paleobear   17-10-2009 om 20:46

paleobear
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Give us higher resolution pictures for the first one.

 
pilot   25-10-2009 om 19:35

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11









Hello paleobeer (Tommy) and others.
These are more close-up pics of the fossils in the first stone.
Hope they are clear enough for you all to identify.


 
webmaster   26-10-2009 om 12:40

webmaster
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I think these are sections of crinoid stems. Often after the death of the animal the sections op the stems get separated. The calcium skeletons fossilize very well.

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pilot   26-10-2009 om 23:07

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11

quote:
webmaster wrote:
I think these are sections of crinoid stems. Often after the death of the animal the sections op the stems get separated. The calcium skeletons fossilize very well.


Thanks webmaster.
Nice to know, I will try to find out more about crinoid stems.

 
0dinofthenorth   03-08-2010 om 18:36

0dinofthenorth
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I'm not sure but the last one could be a meteorite.

 
masteroffossiles   07-08-2010 om 13:53

masteroffossiles
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last one is what we call here 'vuursteen' litteraly translated it means firestone but i dont know if that's the right english name for this kind of stone.
greetings,
sander

 
Elbert   07-08-2010 om 14:20

Elbert
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Hi, he means flint.
greetings, Bert

____________________________
Elbert

 
pilot   03-09-2010 om 21:29

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11

Hello Thomas, Sander and Bert.

Thanks for your answers. I don't think it is a meteorite, although when I found it I thought it might be. But is not particularly heavy and does not stick to a magnet (I understand all meteorites should do)
So "vuursteen" or flint.

Thanks again.
Greetings,
Chris.

 
0dinofthenorth   03-09-2010 om 22:05

0dinofthenorth
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I agree, it’s not a meteorite. Where did you find this wierd piece of flint?, i've never seen it like that before.

[Editted by 0dinofthenorth on 03-09-2010 at 22:06 GMT +1]

 
pilot   05-09-2010 om 21:38

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11

Hello Thomas.

I found it in Denmark close to the rock with the rugose coral print.
It is a strange shape. I expected flint to have more sharp edges. These are, well, a little blunt, as if the outer surface is melted bij heat. The surface is very smooth.
Then again, maybe it is erosion and enviromental causes polished the rock with this result.

Greetings, Chris.

 
0dinofthenorth   05-09-2010 om 21:58

0dinofthenorth
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Lid sinds: 29-05-2009
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Hi Chris.
I looked on the internet about flint, when I found a substance called Obsidian, here's a little about it...
Obsidian is an extrusive igneous rock that is composed mainly of the minerals feldspar and quartz. It has been used as a natural form of glass for its cutting properties since prehistoric times. Obsidian is commonly referred to as "volcanic glass". Today it is considered to be a gemstone and is used in making beautiful jewellery.
Our obsidian comes in three "flavours" depending on your requirements: black, snowflake and mahogany. The black is the beautiful, black and shiny and will produce extremely sharp edges when knapped. The snowflake is full of white "flakes" providing a beautiful finish. The mahogany coloured obsidian is a beautiful creamy brown colour.
Could this be what it is?


[Editted by 0dinofthenorth on 06-09-2010 at 17:10 GMT +1]

[Editted by 0dinofthenorth on 10-09-2010 at 08:30 GMT +1]

 
Bram   05-09-2010 om 23:09

Bram
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Flint can have all kinds of different shapes, some even resembling bones/animals. That's because flint could have formed around things like burrows, which don't have straight curves/sharp edges. When flint get's weathered by the sea, it'll get even smoother edges.

Greetings,
Bram

 
pilot   09-09-2010 om 20:36

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11

Hello Bram.

Thanks for your info about flint. Your remark that it can have different kind of shapes, sometimes boney like, confirmes to me that my rock must be flint, weathered by erosion. I also googled obsedian (as Thomas suggested it could be) wich is very nice looking. But I don,t think thats what I have.
I'll stick with flint.
Thanks again all of you for your replies.

Greetings, Chris.

 
0dinofthenorth   09-09-2010 om 21:21

0dinofthenorth
Senior Lid
Lid sinds: 29-05-2009
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It's ok, maybe you could take a look at my idents too?

 
Elbert   09-09-2010 om 22:07

Elbert
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Lid sinds: 02-08-2009
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Hi, this brownish flint is often called chert, a name that makes clear that it is not the well nown black flint wich is often found in the chalk cliffs of southern England.

greetings Bert

____________________________
Elbert

 
pilot   12-09-2010 om 23:12

pilot
Junior Lid
Lid sinds: 12-10-2009
Berichten: 11

Hello Bert and Thomas.

I have never heard of chert before, so I have learned something new today (again), thanks to this forum.
Thomas, I have been looking at your idents, but to be honest, I have no idea what I am looking at. I really am a novice in this field. I hope you'll get some answers. (if you do, I'll be reading them as well!)

Greetings, Chris.

 
0dinofthenorth   13-09-2010 om 08:43

0dinofthenorth
Senior Lid
Lid sinds: 29-05-2009
Berichten: 1114

Thanks!!!
Sorry I couldn't help you any more.

 




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